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Friday, April 15, 2016

The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Sidearms Part I

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan
UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter taking off from Firebase Vegas with wounded soldiers after a resupply helicopter was blown up on the LZ after being hit with an RPG. Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.

In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 


Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 


For our fifth installment, let’s take a look at the most commonly encountered sidearms in the War in Afghanistan. A sidearm, usually a handgun, is worn on the body in a holster to allow immediate access and use. A sidearm is to be used if the primary weapon is not available; if it has run out of ammunition or if it malfunctions.




Part I: The United States


M9
The M9 is the most commonly encountered handgun in Afghanistan in use with the US Military. You pretty much can't go anywhere without seeing one, it is basically the M4 of handguns in terms of prevalence.  

The M9 is a short recoil, semi-automatic, single-action / double-action pistol which uses a 15-round staggered box magazine with a reversible magazine release button that can be positioned for either right- or left-handed shooters. The M9 has been in use with the United States military since 1985.

  • Cartridge: 9x19mm
  • Effective Range: 50 m
  • Weight: 2.08 lbs / 0.94 kg Unloaded
  • Rate of Fire: N/A
  • Capacity: 15-round magazine

3rd Platoon Viper Co. 1-26 INF soldiers on patrol in the village of Kandalay, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.




M11
The M11(Sig P228) is in use with the US Army, Navy, and Airforce. 

The M11 pistol is a 9-mm, semiautomatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated, double-action weapon. The M11 has been in use with the United States military since 1989.


  • Cartridge: 9x19mm
  • Effective Range: 50 m
  • Weight: 2 lbs / 0.91 kg w/ Magazine
  • Rate of Fire: N/A
  • Capacity: 10, 13, and 15-round magazines


CH-47 Chinook helicopter getting ready to land at Firebase Vegas for resupply




Glock 17/19

Glock pistols can be found in Afghanistan in use with US forces, but in a much more limited quantity than the M9/M11. Most units using Glock pistols fall under the command of USSOCOM.

The Glock 17/19 is a 9 mm short recoil–operated, locked-breech semi-automatic pistol that uses a modified Browning cam-lock system adapted from the Hi-Power pistol.
  • Cartridge: 9x19mm (Glock 17 & 19)
  • Effective Range: 50 m
  • Weight: 1.57 lbs / 0.71 kg unloaded
  • Rate of Fire: N/A
  • Capacity: 15, 17, and 33-round magazines

AH-64 Apache attack helicopter scanning the Korengal Valley around Firebase Vegas for enemy activity ahead of  CH-47 Chinook resupply helicopters.












Shawn Garlow at OP Rock, Firebase Vegas
Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.









For more info on these and other weapons
Technical specs compiled from:
http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
https://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/



For Use of Photos by Shawn Garlow
Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

DISCLAIMER: GLOCK is a federally registered trademark of GLOCK, Inc. and is one of many trademarks owned by GLOCK, Inc. or GLOCK Ges.mbH. Neither Cactus Tactical, nor this site are affiliated in any manner with, or otherwise endorsed by, GLOCK, Inc. or GLOCK Ges.mbH. The use of GLOCK on this page is merely to advertise the sale of GLOCK pistols, parts, or components. For genuine GLOCK, Inc. and GLOCK Ges.mbH products and parts visit www.glock.com.

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Friday, April 08, 2016

The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Individual Weapons Part II

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan
Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.

In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 


Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 


For our fourth installment, let’s take a look at the most commonly encountered individual weapons in Afghanistan; focusing on the most common rifles and carbines of the war. Rifles have longer barrels than carbines allowing for the projectile to reach a higher velocity, range and accuracy. Carbines on the other hand have shorter barrels and often have collapsible (telescoping) stocks. This allows the weapon system to be more compact and better for maneuvering in close quarters battle as well as clearing rooms, trenches, and other tight or enclosed areas.




Part II: ACF/AAF

AK
More than any other weapon in the War in Afghanistan the AK (or AK47) is by far the single most commonly encountered. The ammo and weapon itself are plentiful throughout Afghanistan. I cannot count the number of times I have been shot at by an AK while in Afghanistan. The wide availability of the AK in Afghanistan is due in part to the US, Pakistan, and other countries governments supplying the Mujahideen and Taliban with them during the Afghan Soviet War and during some time after the war. 

The AK-47 is a selective-fire (semi-automatic and automatic), gas-operated 7.62×39mm assault rifle, developed in the Soviet Union by Mikhail Kalashnikov. It is officially known in the Soviet documentation as Avtomat Kalashnikova.

    • Cartridge: 7.62x39mm 
    • Effective Range: 350 m
    • Weight: 7.7 lbs / 3.47 kg
    • Rate of Fire: 600 rounds per minute
    • Capacity: 30 and 40- round magazines, 75 and 100-round drums
            Questioning a local found along the perimeter around Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.


            AKM
            Just as with the AK, the AKM was also supplied by various countries to the Mujahideen and Taliban, and is found in large quantities across Afghanistan.

            The AKM is an assault rifle using the 7.62×39mm Soviet intermediate cartridge. It is gas operated with a rotating bolt. The AKM is capable of selective fire, firing either single shots or automatic at a cyclic rate of 600 rounds/min. Despite being replaced in the late 1970s by the AK-74 the AKM is still in service in some Russian Army reserve and second-line units and several east European countries.
            • Cartridge: 7.62x39mm
            • Effective Range: 350 m 
            • Weight: 6.83 lbs / 3.1 kg without magazine
            • Rate of Fire: 600 rounds per minute
            • Capacity: 30 and 40-round magazines, 75 and 100-round drum.
            Investigating an area used by AAF forces to fire upon OP Rock with volleys of RPGs and small arms fire.



            AK74
            While not as common as the AK and AKM the AK74 can be found occasionally but is not highly prevalent due to a lower availability of it's ammunition. 

            The AK-74 is an adaptation of the 7.62×39mm AKM assault rifle and features several important design improvements. These improvements were primarily the result of converting the rifle to the intermediate-caliber, high velocity 5.45×39mm cartridge. In fact, some early models are reported to have been converted AKMs, re-barreled to 5.45×39mm. Compared to the preceding AKM the AK-74 has better effective range, firing accuracy (a main development goal) and reliability. The AK-74 and AKM share an approximate 50% parts commonality (interchangeable most often are pins, springs and screws).
            • Cartridge: 5.45x39mm
            • Effective Range: 500 m Point Target, 800 m Area Target
            • Weight: 6.8 lbs / 3.07 kg without magazine
            • Rate of Fire: 650 rounds per minute
            • Capacity: 30 or 45-round RPK-74 detachable box magazine or 60-round casket magazine
            Investigating structure in abandoned village used by AAF fighters apparently as a medical station.


            SA Vz.58
            The SA Vz.58 can be found in Afghanistan in small numbers. ACF/AAF fighters usually acquire theses through thefts and attacks on government/military forces and government/military  compounds.

            The SA Vz.58 is a gas operated, magazine fed, selective fire weapon. It uses a more or less conventional short stroke gas piston, located above the barrel. The gas piston has its own return spring. The locking system features a linearly moving bolt (breechblock) with a separate tilting locking piece. The breechblock (bolt) is located under the bolt carrier, and the locking piece is hinged to the bolt and located under it. The weapon fires from the closed bolt all times. When the weapon is fired, the gas piston gives a short tap to the bolt carrier. After a free movement of about 22 mm (.9 inch) the bolt carrier swings the locking piece up from the locking recesses in the receiver, and thus unlocks the bolt. From this moment on the bolt group moves back at once, extracting and ejecting the spent case and chambering the fresh cartridge. At the end of the return stroke the bolt stops in the forward most position against the breech face, while the bolt carrier continues to move forward, swinging the locking piece down and into the locking recesses, thus locking the bolt to the receiver. The overall system can be roughly described as a mix between the Walther P-38 pistol and the CzechZB-26 (or British Bren) machine gun locking. The charging handle is attached to the right side of the bolt carrier. The trigger / hammer unit also differs from the most common designs in that it is a striker fired design. The massive cylindrical striker is located at the rear, hollowed part of the bolt, and has its own spring located under the bolt group return spring. The striker has a lug that interacts with the sear and is used to hold the striker in the cocked position. The overall design of the trigger unit is relatively simple and has few moving parts. The safety / fire mode selector switch is located at the right side of the receiver, and has 3 positions for safe, semi, and full automatic fire.
            • Cartridge: 7.62x39mm
            • Effective Range: 800 m, 2,800 m Maximum Range
            • Weight: 6.4 lbs / 2.91 kg 
            • Rate of Fire: 800 rounds per minute
            • Capacity: 30-round magazine
            On patrol in the village of Kandalay, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.



            SKS
            Chinese copies of the SKS have made their way into Afghanistan over the years. Though not as prevalent as the AK and its variants, the SKS can be found in small numbers in caches as well as occasionally in the hands of dispatched enemy fighters.  

            The SKS is a gas operated, magazine fed, semi-auto weapon. It utilizes a short-stroke gas piston with its own return spring, and a tilting bolt locking, where a bolt tips down to lock onto the floor of the receiver. The charging handle is attached to the right side of the bolt carrier and moves when gun is fired. Receiver is machined from steel. The SKS is fed from the integral 10-round magazine, which could be loaded from the top through the open bolt by loose cartridges or by using special 10-round stripper clips. Stripper clip guides are machined into the front of the bolt carrier. Military-issue SKS carbines are equipped with non-detachable bayonets, that could be folded down and backward when not in use. Soviet, East German and Yugoslavian carbines use blade-shaped bayonets, Chinese Type 56 carbines use spike-shaped bayonets, which are slightly longer than the blade-shaped ones. In general, the SKS is an excellent all-around weapon that offers slightly longer range and better accuracy than an AK, but for modern military use lacks the magazine capacity and selective-fire capabilities.
            • Cartridge: 7.62x39mm
            • Effective Range: 400 M
            • Weight: 8.5 lbs / 3.85 kg
            • Rate of Fire: 35-40 rounds per minute
            • Capacity: 10-round internal box magazine
            One of our adopted Platoon Dogs "Champ" at a fighting position at Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.


            PPSh-41



            The PPSh-41 is a magazine-fed selective fire submachine gun using an open-bolt, blowback action. Made largely of stamped steel, it can be loaded with either a box or drum magazine, and fires the 7.62×25mm Tokarev pistol round.
            • Cartridge: 7.62x25mm Tokarev
            • Effective Range: 125-150 m
            • Weight: 8 lbs / 3.63 kg without magazine
            • Rate of Fire: 900 to 1000+ rounds per mintue
            • Capacity: 35-round box magazine or 71-round drum magazine

            Infantryman manning radio/.50 Cal. position at OP Rock, Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan. 













            Myself  before going out to set up an ambush for ACF/AAF forces
            Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan. 








            For more info on these and other weapons
            Technical specs compiled from:
            http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
            http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
            https://en.wikipedia.org
            http://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/



            For Use of Photos by Shawn Garlow
            Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

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            Friday, April 01, 2016

            The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

            Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Individual Weapons Part I

            Weapons of the War in Afghanistan
            Viper CO. 1-26 INF Infantryman resting between guard shifts,
            OP Rock, Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.


            In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 


            Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 


            For our fourth installment, let’s take a look at the most commonly encountered individual weapons in Afghanistan; focusing on the most common rifles and carbines of the war. Rifles have longer barrels than carbines allowing for the projectile to reach a higher velocity, range and accuracy. Carbines on the other hand have shorter barrels and often have collapsible (telescoping) stocks. This allows the weapon system to be more compact and better for maneuvering in close quarters battle as well as clearing rooms, trenches, and other tight or enclosed areas.  

            Some of the sleeping quarters at OP Rock, Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley Afghanistan.


            Part I: The United States


            M4

            By far the most common weapon in Afghanistan next to the AK. If you have deployed to Afghanistan in a combat role, you probably were issued one of these, or at least carried one from time to time. The M4 is light, compact, and if properly maintained very reliable. You may have heard stories, or complaints that the M4 with it's shorter barrel and m855 rounds, is somewhat anemic or ineffective in battle. With good training and proper shot placement with controlled pairs or Mozambique drills (2 in the chest - 1 in the head), the M4 is a very capable and deadly weapon. I carried the M4 many times in Afghanistan and had no problem trusting my life with it.

            The M4 is a 5.56x45mm, magazine-fed, gas-operated, air-cooled, shoulder-fired weapon. It is designed to fire either semiautomatic or a three-round burst through the use of a selector lever (SAFE, SEMI, and BURST). The M4A1 is fully automatic. The M4-series carbine buttstock has four positions: closed, 1/2 open, 3/4 open, and full open. The M4 carbine becomes the M4 MWS when the M4 rail adapter system is installed on it.


            • Cartridge: 5.56x45mm NATO
            • Effective Range: 500 m Point, 600 m Area, 3,600 m Maximum range.
            • Weight: 7.5 lbs / 3.4 kg
            • Rate of Fire: 700-900 rounds per minute (cyclic)
            • Capacity: 30-round Standard USGI Magazine (Magazines also available in 5,10,20,50,60,90,100-round capacities, though most are not officially authorized for use) 

            Myself after a patrol with an M4 w/M203 Grenade Launcher, ACOG, and AN/PEQ-15 laser.
            Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.



            M16

            The M16 has been in service with the United States military since 1963. Initially the rifle was very problematic. This was due to some design/production issues as well as inadequate training and familiarization with service personnel. After being fielded in Vietnam the rifle received upgrades based on the problems experienced in combat. The rifle then began gaining popularity with service members. Many were impressed with the wounding capacity of the 5.56mm round in the m193 cartridge. While the M16 had been the standard US service rifle for 40+ years, the M4 has edged it's way in and taken over the role, pushing the M16 out to support and non-infantry service members. 

            The M16 is a 5.56x45mm, magazine fed, gas-operated, air-cooled, semiautomatic or three-round burst, hand-held, shoulder-fired weapon.
            A1 and A3 variants are full-auto versus 3-round burst. Military issue M16A4s are also equipped with a Knight's Armament Company M5 RAS hand guard, allowing vertical grips, lasers, tactical lights, and other accessories to be attached, coining the designation M16A4 MWS (or Modular Weapon System) in U.S. Army field manuals.


            • Cartridge: 5.56x45mm NATO
            • Effective Range: 550 m Point, 600 m Area, 3,600 m Maximum range.
            • Weight: 10.09 lbs / 4.56 kg
            • Rate of Fire: 800 rounds per minute (cyclic)
            • Capacity: 20 & 30-round Standard USGI Magazine (Magazines also available in 5,10,50,60,90,100-round capacities, though most are not officially authorized for use)

            Picture taken while on patrol in the Korengal Valley, of houses and terraces used for farming in the steep mountains.


            FN SCAR


            Though nowhere nearly as common as the M4 and M16, the FN Scar made it's major debut in Afghanistan in April 2009. Fielded almost exclusively by US Army Rangers and various other US Special Operations Forces.

            The SCAR is a shoulder fired, air-cooled, magazine fed, short stroke gas operated, select fire, modular weapon system. The SCAR features a receiver with a continuous, monolithic 12 o’clock rail along with a 3, 6, and 9 o’clock rail on forward portion. The SCAR has the capability of operator-level barrel changes for mission requirements. All complete barrel assemblies are free floating and suppressor compatible when secured to receiver. The buttstock provides adjustable cheek rest, 6-position Length of Pull, and is capable of side folding. SCAR has numerous ambidextrous features.


            • Cartridge: 5.56x45mm NATO (Mk 16), 7.62x51mm NATO (Mk 17)
            • Effective Range: 600 m Point Target (Mk 16), 700 m Point Target (Mk 17)
            • Weight: 7.2 lbs / 3.3 kg empty (Mk 16), 7.9 lbs / 3.6 kg empty (Mk 17)
            • Rate of Fire: 625 rounds per minute (Mk 16), 600 rounds per minute (Mk 17)
            • Capacity: 20 and 30-round magazines (Mk 16), 10 and 20-round magazines (Mk 17)

            3rd Platoon, Viper Co. 1-26 INF RTO w/ dog overwatching friendly movement on the Korengal Road.
            Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.









            Shawn Garlow at the Korengal Outpost










            For more info on these and other weapons
            Technical specs compiled from:
            http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
            http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
            https://en.wikipedia.org
            http://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/
            http://www.fnamerica.com/products/scar-family/


            For Use of Photos by Shawn Garlow
            Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

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            Nordic Components by Cactus Tactical

            Friday, March 25, 2016

            The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

            Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Squad Automatic Weapons Part II

            Weapons of the War in Afghanistan
            Soldiers of 3rd PLT Viper Co. 1-26 INF on patrol in the Korengal Valley.


            In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 


            Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 


            For our third installment, let’s take a look at the most commonly encountered Squad Automatic Weapons in Afghanistan. In an infantry fireteam the SAW gunner carries the most casualty-producing weapon in the team. Most squad automatic weapons are select-fire or fully automatic light machine guns, and are usually of the same caliber as the rifles and carbines present in the team. Some of the duties of the SAW gunner is to provide overwatch and suppressive fire for the fireteam.


            Soldiers in overwatch of friendly movement on road below, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.






            Part II: Anti-Coalition Forces / Anti-Afghan Forces

            RPK
            Due to the wide availability of the 7.62x39mm round in Afghanistan, and having been used by the Russians in the Afghan-Soviet War, it is not uncommon to come across an RPK. With its high rate of fire, effective range due to the longer barrel, and high maneuverability, the RPK squad automatic weapon in well trained hands can pin down a fire team, and potentially cause a bad day. 

            The RPK is a gas operated, magazine fed, air cooled, selective fire weapon. The basic action is similar to that of the Kalashnikov assault rifle. The trigger unit and safety is also the same, therefore the RPK fires from a closed bolt in both semi-automatic and automatic modes. The barrel is permanently fixed to the receiver and cannot be replaced in the field. RPK and AKM magazines are interchangeable, but the standard magazines for the RPK are of a higher capacity; the most common hold 40 rounds of ammunition. Standard sights are hooded post front and tangent type rear sight, marked for ranges between 100 and 1000 meters with a windage adjustment mechanism. RPK machine guns are fitted with integral folding bipods made from steel stampings. The shoulder stock is of a special shape, which facilitates the proper hold for the non-firing hand. Special versions of the RPK, made for airborne troops, had a side-folding butt stock. This version is designated as the RPKS.



          • Cartridge: RPK & RPKS - 7.62x39mm; RPK-74 & RPKS-74 - 5.45x39mm
          • Effective Range: 800-1,000 m; Maximum range 3,150 m
          • Weight: RPK 10.6 lbs (4.8 kg); RPK-74 10 lbs (4.7 kg)
          • Rate of Fire: RPK 600 rounds per minute; RPK-74 650 rounds per minute
          • Capacity: RPK, RPKS: 20, 30, or 40-round magazine, 75-round drum; RPK-74, RPKS-74: 30 or 45-round magazine, 100-round plastic drum, belt ammunition (with side mounted belt feed device).


          • Overwatching suspected AAF fighters in structure below, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.

            AP Custom Rhino Series NiB trigger Group


            RPD
            The RPD is one of the most commonly found machine guns in Afghanistan. With the ease of acquiring ammunition, its high rate of fire, and effective range of 800 meters, it is one of the favorites of ACF/AAF fighters for attacking firebases and outposts, as well as troop movements. Chances are if you have taken automatic fire in Afghanistan, this was probably one of the culprits.

            The RPD is a gas operated, belt fed, air cooled, full auto only weapon. The gas system uses a long stroke piston and a gas regulator, located under the barrel. It uses a simple and robust bolt locking system seen in other Degtyarov guns, which uses two locking flaps, that are pushed out of the bolt body into recesses in the receiver walls to lock the bolt. Flaps are pushed out by the bolt carrier to lock and are withdrawn from recesses to unlock the bolt by specially shaped cams on the carrier. A detachable round box drum can be clipped under the receiver; this box can hold a 100-rounds. Unlike earlier Degtyarov guns, the return spring is located inside the butt. The heavy barrel cannot be replaced quickly in the field, but the RPD can still provide significant firepower at ranges up to 800 meters. Rear sights are adjustable for range and drift, folding integral bipod is located under the barrel.




          • Cartridge: 7.62x39mm
          • Effective Range: 800 m 
          • Weight: 16.31 lbs (7.4 kg)
          • Rate of Fire: 650-750 rounds per minute
          • Capacity: 100-round belt in drum



          • View of Firebase Vegas from the latrine. As you can see going to the latrine during daylight hours opens you up to hostile fire. Many times those going to the latrine would draw out sniper and machine gun fire from high ground surrounding the firebase.

            AP Custom Rhino Series Carbon Fiber Freefloat Handguard, 7 inch Length







            Shawn Garlow (lower right) w/ 1st Squad- 3rd Platoon, Viper Co. 1-26 INF
            Firebase Vegas, Korengal Valley, Afghanistan.










            For more info on these and other weapons
            Technical specs compiled from:


            For Use of Photos by Shawn Garlow
            Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

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            Nordic Components by Cactus Tactical