The Latest from Cactus Tactical

Suppliers of innovative self defense tactical equipment and police gear

Monday, May 15, 2017

Nordic Components by Cactus Tactical

The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Surveillance/Reconnaissance and Targeting Systems, Part II

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan

In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 

Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 

For our twentieth installment let's take a look the most common Surveillance/Reconnaissance and Targeting Systems used in the War in Afghanistan. 


Part II - The United States

Lightweight Laser Designator Rangefinders

The Lightweight Laser Designator Rangefinder (LLDR) is a crew-served, Soldier-portable, long-range, modular target locator and laser designation system. The primary components are the Target Locator Module (TLM) and the Laser Designator Module (LDM). The AN/PED1A (LLDR-2) reduced system weight by more than five pounds and reduced power consumption. The AN/PED-1B (LLDR 2H) improves target location performance.

The TLM incorporates a thermal imager, day camera, laser designator spot imaging, electronic display, eye-safe laser rangefinder, digital magnetic compass, Selective Availability/Anti-Spoofing Module Global Positioning System (SAASM GPS) and digital export capability. 


The original LLDR 1 (AN/PED-1) operates on one BA-5699 battery, but it can also use a Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) battery when laser designation is not required.


A new compact laser designator is being fielded with the LLDR 2 (AN/PED1A). It requires less power and operates on one common SINGARS battery (BA-5390 or BA-5590).


To provide a precision targeting capability to the dismounted Soldier, PM SPTD developed the LLDR 2H (AN/PED-1B). It integrates a celestial navigation system with the digital magnetic compass in the TLM. The LLDR 2H provides highly accurate target coordinates to allow the Soldier to call for fire with precision GPS guided munitions. A Modification of in Service Equipment program will retrofit fielded LLDR 1 and 2 systems with the LLDR 2H precision targeting capability beginning in FY13.

The TLM operates as a stand-alone device or in conjunction with the LDM. At night and in obscured battlefield conditions, the operator can recognize vehiclesized targets at more than three kilometers. During day operations, soldiers can recognize targets at more than seven kilometers. The LDM emits coded laser pulses compatible with DoD and NATO laser-guided munitions. Soldiers can designate stationary targets at ranges greater than five kilometers.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Weight (total system including batteries for a 24-hour mission):
  • LLDR 1:  35 pounds
  • LLDR 2:  29.5 pounds
  • LLDR 2H:  31.5 pounds


Target Recognition Range:
  • LLDR 1: > 6.5 kilometers day, > 2.5 kilometers night (to a NATO standard vehicle target)
  • LLDR 2 & LLDR 2H: > 7 kilometers day, > 3 kilometers night (to a NATO standard vehicle target) 


Target Location Error:
  • LLDR 1 & LLDR 2:  > 20 meters at 2.5 kilometers range (In a magnetically benign environment)
  • LLDR 2H: < 10 meters at 2.5 kilometers range (when celestial is available)


Laser Designation:
  • All LLDR:  > 5 kilometers to stationary target, > 3 kilometers to a moving target.
















Shawn in the Korengal Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan.








For more info on these and other weapons
Technical specs compiled from:
http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
https://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.militaryfactory.com/
http://www.olive-drab.com/
http://www.army.mil/
http://dok-ing.hr/products/demining/mv_4?productPage=general
http://www.peosoldier.army.mil/




For Use of Photos by Shawn
Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

"The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, May 01, 2017

Nordic Components by Cactus Tactical

The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Surveillance/Reconnaissance and Targeting Systems, Part I

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan

In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 

Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 

For our twentieth installment let's take a look the most common Surveillance/Reconnaissance and Targeting Systems used in the War in Afghanistan. 


Part I - The United States

LRAS3
The LRAS3 is a long range multisensor system designed for use by the US Army platforms in surveillance and reconnaissance missions. It provides real-time, day and night, in adverse weather conditions the capability to detect, recognize, identify, and pinpoint far target locations. The LRAS3 consists of a second generation FLIR, TV camera, GPS interferometer, and an eyesafe laser range finder. It can be mounted either on armored ground vehicles such as the HMMWV, M1, M2 and Stryker or used on a tripod for dismounted missions.

The LRAS3 can establish a target location coordinates at 10 kilometers with an estimated CEP of 60 meters. The laser rangefinder is capable of range measurements with 5 meters accuracy.

The US Army and the US Marine Corps are the largest customers for LRAS3 second generation forward looking infrared (FLIR) system.

Provides Soldiers in Armored, Infantry, Stryker Brigade Combat Teams and Battlefield Surveillance Brigades with a long range surveillance and reconnaissance capability 24 hours a day in all weather conditions.




Laser Target Locators

The Laser Target Locators (LTL) are handheld or tripod-mounted, lightweight laser target locators. They deliver target data to the fire support, and maneuverCommand, Control, Communications, Computer and Intelligence system (C4I).


The Vector 21 is a Binocular Laser Rangefinder (BLRF) with an embedded digital compass. Soldiers can connect the Vector 21 to the Precision Lightweight GPS Receiver (PLGR) or a Defense Advanced GPS Receiver (DAGR) to provide target grid coordinates. When used in conjunction with an AN/PVS-14 Monocular Night Vision Device, the Vector 21 provides a limited night capability.

The Mark VII integrates a monocular direct-view optic, an image intensifier, a laser rangefinder and a digital compass into a day/night target location device. The Mark VII connects to the PLGR or the DAGR to provide grid coordinates to distant targets. The Mark VII provides a limited night capability.


The Mark VIIE is an integrated target locator module with a more powerful 8x day optic. It has an uncooled thermal sight for increased night performance and an embedded GPS receiver for stand-alone targeting operations.


The Target Reconnaissance Infrared Geolocating Rangefinder (TRIGR) is an integrated target locator module with a 7x direct view optic, an improved uncooled thermal sight for significantly increased night performance, a laser rangefinder, digital compass and embedded GPS receiver for stand-alone targeting operations. 

Specifications: 

Weight (handheld): 
  • Vector 21: 3.8 pounds (not including the cable and PLGR or DAGR) 
  • Mark VII: 4.2 pounds
  • Mark VII E: 5.5 pounds 
  • RIGR: 5.5 pounds


Weight (total system): 
  • Vector 21: (daylight), 5.9 pounds; (night), 9.2 pounds (including cables and batteries for day and night and Night Vision Goggles and adapter for night operations)
  • Mark VII: 6 pounds (Including cables and batteries)
  • Mark VII E: 5.5 pounds
  • TRIGR: 5.5 pounds


Target Recognition Ranges:
  • Vector 21 and Mark VII:  >4.2 kilometers day, > .5 kilometers night (to a NATO standard vehicle target)
  • Mark VIIE and TRIGR: >4.2 kilometers day, >1.2 kilometers night (to a NATO standard vehicle target)


Target Location Error: <45 meters at 5 kilometers in a magnetically benign environment 














Shawn in the Korengal Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan.








For more info on these and other weapons
Technical specs compiled from:
http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
https://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.militaryfactory.com/
http://www.olive-drab.com/
http://www.army.mil/
http://dok-ing.hr/products/demining/mv_4?productPage=general
http://www.peosoldier.army.mil/




For Use of Photos by Shawn
Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

"The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, April 24, 2017

Nordic Components by Cactus Tactical

The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Thermal Weapon Sights

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan

In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 

Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 

For our nineteenth installment let's take a look the most common thermal weapon sights used in the War in Afghanistan. 




Part I - The United States

AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS)
The AN/PAS-13 Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) provides Soldiers with individual and crew served weapons the capability to see deep into the battlefield. It increases surveillance and target acquisition range, and penetrates obscurants either day or night. The TWS systems use uncooled, forward-looking infrared technology. It provides a standard video output for training, image transfer or remote viewing. TWS are lightweight systems that Soldiers can mount on a standard weapon rail and operate beyond the maximum effective range of the weapon.

 Product Manager Soldier Maneuver Sensors (PM SMS) is now fielding 17 micron (17um) sensor technology that provides size, weight and power improvements over previous configurations.

The TWS family comprises three variants, each of which is a silent, lightweight, compact, durable and battery-powered thermal sight. They are:

AN/PAS-13(V)1 Light Weapon Thermal Sight (LWTS) for the M16 / M4 series rifles and carbines, as well as the M136 Light Anti-Armor Weapon.


AN/PAS-13(V)2 Medium Weapon Thermal Sight (MWTS) for the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) and M240B series Medium Machine Guns.


AN/PAS-13(V)3 Heavy Weapon Thermal Sight (HWTS) for the squad leader’s weapon, M16 / M4 series rifles and carbines, M24 and M107 sniper rifles, and M2 HB and MK19 machine guns.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Performance of fielded 25um systems.
  • Weight: HWTS: 3.9 pounds; MWTS: 2.9 pounds; LWTS: 1.9 pounds
  • Target recognition range: HWTS: 2,200 meters; MWTS: 1,100 meters; LWTS: 550 meters
  • Operational time: HWTS/MWTS: 6.5 hours (six lithium AAs); LWTS: 5 hours (four lithium AAs) at ambient
  • Magnification: HWTS: 10x/3.3x (narrow/wide); MWTS: 5x/1.66x (narrow/wide); LWTS: 3.1x/1.55x (narrow/wide)
Performance of latest 17um systems.
  • Weight: HWTS: 2.63 pounds; MWTS: 2.17 pounds; LWTS: 1.75 pounds
  • Target recognition range: HWTS: 2,200 meters; MWTS: 1,100 meters; LWTS: 550 meters
  • Operational time: HWTS/MWTS/LWTS: 20 hours (four lithium L91 AA).
  • All variants with one battery change at ambient.
  • Magnification: HWTS: 7.98x/2.66x (narrow/wide); MWTS: 3.98x/1.33x (narrow/wide); LWTS: 2x/1x (narrow/ wide)















Shawn in the Korengal Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan.








For more info on these and other weapons
Technical specs compiled from:
http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
https://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.militaryfactory.com/
http://www.olive-drab.com/
http://www.army.mil/
http://dok-ing.hr/products/demining/mv_4?productPage=general
http://www.peosoldier.army.mil/




For Use of Photos by Shawn
Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

"The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, April 03, 2017

Nordic Components by Cactus Tactical

The Tactical Blog from Cactus Tactical

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan: Individual Night Observation Devices (NODs), Part II

Weapons of the War in Afghanistan

In the world of war, weapons and technology are ever changing, each war is characterized by the weapons and tactics used to fight it. As new environments and enemies are encountered, the parties to those wars develop new - more effective tactics, technologies, and weapons to counter and defeat their adversaries. The ingenuity seen in war has existed since (and most certainly before) the first wars of recorded history and continue to this very day. 


Keeping with that theory, let’s take a look at the weapons that have characterized the wars and conflicts that the United States has been a party to over the course of it’s history. During the course of this series, I aim to breakdown the weapons used in each conflict by their classification, and to which party they were employed by. Having served in combat operations in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, I would like to start our series with the War in Afghanistan. 


For our eighteenth installment let's take a look the most common individual Night Observation Devices (NODs) used in the War in Afghanistan. 




Part II - The United States

AN/AVS-6
The AN/AVS-6 Aviator’s Night Vision imaging System (ANViS) is a third-generation, helmet-mounted, direct-view, image-intensification device. It enables Aviators to operate more effectively and safely during lowlight and degraded battlefield conditions.

The low-light sensitivity represents a 35 to 40 percent improvement over the earliest ANVIS. Additionally, the gated power supply enables operation at significantly higher light levels than any of the previous designs. The ANVIS is capable of operating for 22 hours on two (2) AA Alkaline batteries and 34 hours on two Lithium AA batteries. The Low Profile Power Pack (LPPP) encompasses a primary and alternate capability, which allows Aviators to access a safety backup (alternate) of two additional AA batteries.

Weight (maximum): 1.3 pounds with batteries.  Magnification: 1x  Operational time: 22 or 34 hours, depending on  battery type.  Power: Low-profile battery pack or from aircraft-supplied power.




AN/AVS-7(V)
The AN/AVS-7(V) Heads-Up Display (HUD) takes aircraft data from numerous sensors and converts it to graphic files. This provides critical operational information superimposed as symbology onto the image the pilot sees through the ANVIS. The HUD minimizes the need for Pilots to examine cockpit instrument data, thus providing increased situational awareness outside the aircraft. The HUD system consists of the A-kit, which is the wiring harnesses, mounting brackets, and some additional sensors such as air data transducers, inclinometers, and thermocouple amps. A B-Kit, which consists of one CV4229(V) X/ AVS-7 signal data converter; one C-12293/ AVS-7 converter control unit; and two SU-180/AVS-7 display units. There is also an improved night flat-panel display unit, which can replace the cathode ray tube SU180s on the legacy platforms. In addition, there is a day flat panel display to give additional situational awareness capabilities. Both flat panel displays can plug and play with legacy systems.






AN/PVS-30
The AN/PVS-30 Clip-on Sniper Night Sight (CoSNS) is a lightweight, in-line weapon-mounted sight used in conjunction with the day optic sight on the M110 SASS and the M2010 ESR. It employs a variable gain image tube Snipers can adjust depending on ambient light levels. When used in conjunction with the M110 and M2010 day optical sight, it provides for personnel-sized target recognition at quarter moon illumination in clear air to a range of 600 meters. The CoSNS has an integrated rail adapter that interfaces directly to the MIL-STD-1913 rail for quick and easy mounting to or dismounting from the weapon.

The CoSNS allows a Sniper to maintain the current level of accuracy with the M110 and to deliver precise fire within 1 minute of angle. Use of the CoSNS does not affect the zero of the day optical sight and allows the M110 and the M2010 to maintain bore sight throughout the focus range of the CoSNS and the M110 and M2010 day optical sight.

Weight: < 3.5 pounds  Man-sized target recognition: ≥ 600 meters Focus range: 25 meters to infinity Power: One AA Battery Operational Time: 30 hours on one AA lithium battery. (Battery life dependent on temperature)















Shawn in the Korengal Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan.








For more info on these and other weapons
Technical specs compiled from:
http://armypubs.army.mil/doctrine/Active_FM.html
http://world.guns.ru/index-e.html
https://en.wikipedia.org
http://www.militaryfactory.com/
http://www.olive-drab.com/
http://www.army.mil/
http://dok-ing.hr/products/demining/mv_4?productPage=general





For Use of Photos by Shawn
Contact: garlow.co@gmail.com

"The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,